THE RESEARCH TEAM OF THE BRITISH ELECTION STUDY, 2001, 2005-06, AND 2009-10

Harold D. Clarke, Ph.D. Political Science, Duke University, is Ashbel Smith Professor in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas, as well as Adjunct Professor of Government at the University of Essex, and a former Division Director, Division of Social and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation.

        He has been Co-Editor of Political Research Quarterly and is Chief Editor of Electoral Studies. He teaches time series and survey research methodology courses at the Essex Summer School in Data Collection and Analysis, the ICPSR Summer School, University of Michigan and the Workshops in Social Science Research, Concordia University. In 2012, he will be a faculty participant in the EITM Summer Workshop, University of Houston.

 

David Sanders, Ph.D. Government, University of Essex, is Professor of Government at the University of Essex. He also has been Head of Department and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the University of Essex. He is Co-Editor of the British Journal of Political Science, and a Fellow of The British Academy.

        His research and teaching areas include electoral behaviour, election forecasting, media and politics, political participation, and experimental methodology in political research. He has been principal investigator of the British Election Study (2001, 2005, and 2009-10), and his work has been supported by the Economic and Social Research Council, the Electoral Commission (U.K.), and the European Commission. His recent books are Performance Politics and The British Voter (Cambridge University Press, 2009) and Political Choice in Britain (Oxford University Press, 2004). He has published numerous articles in the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Electoral Studies, Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, Political Research Quarterly, and other academic journals.

 

Marianne C. Stewart, Ph.D. Political Science, Duke University, is Professor in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. She currently is Editor of the American Journal of Political Science, and she has been Associate and Assistant Editor of International Studies Quarterly and the Journal of Politics, respectively. She also has been Executive Vice Dean, Acting Dean, Director of Graduate Studies, and Political Science Program Director at UTDallas, and Political Science Program Director in the Division of Social and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation.

        She conducts research and teaches in the areas of electoral politics, political choice, and research methodology, including the conduct of inquiry, survey design, and data analysis. She has been co-investigator of the British Election Study (2001, 2005, 2009-10) and funded by the National Science Foundation and the Economic and Social Research Council (U.K.). Her recent books are Performance Politics and The British Voter (Cambridge University Press, 2009) and Political Choice in Britain (Oxford University Press, 2004). Her articles have been in the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, and other leading journals.

 

Paul Whiteley, Ph.D. Government, University of Essex, is Professor of Government at the University of Essex. He has been Director of the Democracy and Participation Programme of the Economic and Social Research Council and Member of the Editorial Board of the European Journal of Political Research.

        His research and teaching focus on British political parties, the comparative analysis of citizenship and social capital, electoral behaviour, and political economy. He has been co-investigator of the British Election Study (2001, 2005, 2009-10), and has received multiple research grants from the Economic and Social Research Council and the National Science Foundation (U.S.). He has authored or co-authored numerous books, including Performance Politics and The British Voter (Cambridge University Press, 2009), Third-Force Politics: Liberal Democrats at the Grassroots (Oxford University Press, 2006), Political Choice in Britain (Oxford University Press, 2004), and Citizenship in Britain: Values, Participation and Democracy (Cambridge University Press, 2004). His articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, British Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, and other major journals.

 

THE ADVISORY BOARD OF THE BRITISH ELECTION STUDY, 2009-10

The 2009-10 BES Team is pleased to announce the appointment of the following individuals to the Advisory Board of the British Election Study. The Board is intended to represent the BES user communities and to provide input on the project in general, its components in particular, and, accordingly, its further development as a leading research resource.

Andre Blais, Canada Research Chair in Electoral Studies, Universite de Montreal, Canada.

Paolo Bellucci, Professor of Political Science, University of Siena, and Italian National Election Study Co-Principal Investigator, Italy.

Sarah Childs, Senior Lecturer in Politics, University of Bristol, UK.

Philip Cowley, Professor of Politics and International Relations, Nottingham University, and Elections, Public Opinion and Parties Specialist Group Co-Convenor, UK.

David Denver, Professor of Politics and International Relations, Lancaster University, UK.

Rachel Gibson, Professor, Institute for Social Change, University of Manchester, UK.

Simon Jackman, Professor of Political Science and Statistics, Stanford University, and American National Election Studies (ANES) Co-Principal Investigator, USA.

Richard Johnston, Professor of Political Science and Distinguished University Scholar, University of British Columbia, Canada, and National Annenberg Election Study (NAES) Research Director, University of Pennsylvania, USA.

Ron Johnston, FBA and Professor of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, UK.

Lawrence LeDuc, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto, Canada.

Michael Lewis-Beck, Professor of Political Science, University of Iowa, USA.

Ian McAllister, Professor of Political Science, Australian National University, and Australian Election Study Co-Director, Australia, and the Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES) Planning Committee Chair.

Anthony Mughan, Professor of Political Science and Director of International Studies, Ohio State University, USA.

Charles Pattie, Professor of Geography, University of Sheffield, UK.

Gemma Rosenblatt, Research and Evaluation Manager, The Electoral Commission, UK.

Cees van der Eijk, Professor of Social Science Research Methods and Director of Social Sciences Methods and Data Institute, University of Nottingham, UK.

Lynn Vavreck, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of California, Los Angeles and Cooperative Campaign Analysis Project (CCAP) Co-Principal Investigator, USA.

Christopher Wlezien, Professor of Political Science, Temple University, USA.